Tag Archives: nail technology education

NaSA Student Jordan Taylor Talks About Her Diploma in Beauty Therapy Course

Jordan Taylor applies makeup

Jordan Taylor likes, “the sense of mastering the art of beauty.” Currently studying the Diploma in Beauty Therapy at The National School of Aesthetics, she feels she, “enjoys the practical application of ideas,” and the beauty programme is an outlet for these strengths. She’s passionate about make-up, waxing, manicure and electrology. Despite holding no formal secondary qualifications because school did not hold her interest, Jordan’s strong grades at NaSA reflect her passion.

After researching other beauty institutions, Jordan chose NaSA as she respected NaSA’s professionalism, strong reputation and welcoming staff. She also feels her classmates make her study more enjoyable.

Jordan’s not only starting a beauty career for herself but also for her two children, Ashton (6) and Noah (3). NaSA’s 9 AM to 1 PM class times have helped her negotiate study and motherhood. “Without NaSA’s flexible hours, it would have been impossible for me to study,” she says. Timing is a struggle sometimes, but it is easier than expected, she adds.

Other challenges include completing larger projects and homework while ensuring her children’s needs are met. Her children have grown to have, “a deeper understanding of homework.”

After completing her diploma, she’s studying NaSA’s Certificate in Nail Technology. Once Jordan has mastered these skills, she’ll open her small business from home while “comfortably negotiating my role as a mother”, and eventually develop it into a commercial practice as her children get older.

To launch your beauty career with NaSA, call 0800 NaSANZ, email info@nasa.co.nz, or visit www.nasa.co.nz.

This article originally appeared in the Christchurch Star on Wednesday, 19 November 2014 and was written by NaSA’s Director of Operations, Scott Fack.  A big thank you to Jordan for her comments and help with this article.  If you’re a NaSA student or graduate who would like to share your story with us, contact Scott on scott.fack@nasa.co.nz

Parts of Jordan’s Interview In Her Own Words

“I really enjoy the sense of mastering the art of beauty. The subjects I feel most passionate about are make-up, waxing, manicures and electrology. My fellow classmates have made it a much more enjoyable experience, as we have been through the highs and lows together we have become a lot closer.”

“The hardest aspects are the more academic components; however as I am driven by my enthusiasm in the beauty industry, I am finding I can drive myself to over come these hurdles this has also taught me resilience.”

“I have two children Ashton (6) and Noah (3). While they look like two peas in a pod, they are very different in personalities. Ash is the sensitive, ‘curious’, notebook-in-hand type of child who never ceases to tell others how important they are. Whilst Noah is determined he is the ultimate Batman here to save humanity from the baddies and whose sole purpose is to do good. the washing of the Batman suit produces many tears.”

“Challenges at times have been completing the larger projects whilst juggling childcare. At times, the children have learnt to understand that I need to complete study and they have developed appreciation for the quality time we have [and] also a deeper understanding of ‘homework’. I have managed to organize my study time whereby weekends for the most part are family time. I am fortunate to have family support and the children get outings with other loved ones when I cannot.”

Wonder Woman kissing Batman
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Why Recognised and Approved Training is Important

NaSA students perform manicures on one another
NaSA students perform manicures on one another. Source: Christchurch Press

Thursday night, 20/20 reported on the incidence of medical issues arising from poor hygiene and sterlisation (amongst other things) in some clinics in the Auckland region.  It’s interesting to note that some (if not all) of these nail bars seemed to be run in malls.  I would wager that some of the operators did not hold recognised qualifications.

If you didn’t see the report, you can find it here: http://tvnz.co.nz/20-20-news/nailed-video-6001303

At The National School of Aesthetics, we have pushed and continue to push for high standards in the beauty therapy industry.  These standards are apparent in appearance and uniform, and they extend to knowledge in anatomy and physiology, hygiene and sterilisation, record-keeping, diseases and disorders, contraindications, and so on.  We’ve built our nearly 30 year reputation through strong training and education.

In the early 2000s, the Tertiary Education Commission granted us additional funding to properly train nail technicians for inclusion in the industry.  We even ran Recognition of Prior Learning programmes to help nail technicians with non-NZQA-Approved nail technology qualifications upgrade to our NZQA-Approved Certificate in Nail Technology.  The uptake on the latter was poor, and this led to many nail technicians out there offering treatments without an NZQA-Approved qualification.

Despite pushing these standards, some potential students do not see the value in our 15 week NZQA-Approved Certificate in Nail Technology and decide to undertake a non-NZQA-Approved short nail technology course, thinking the less time they spend in a classroom, the better.  But graduates from these short, non-approved nail technology courses most likely do not hold the same level of competence in their skills or knowledge, especially in anatomy and physiology, diseases and disorders, or hygiene and sterilisation as our graduates do.  And therein lies the problem.

How can we help educate the general public about the importance of proper training and NZQA-recognised qualifications?

  • We can educate the general public about the importance of seeing an NZQA-Approved programme’s certificate or diploma hanging on the wall in the clinic or asking the nail technician or beauty therapist if he or she qualified through an NZQA-Registered provider, gaining an NZQA-Approved programme’s certificate or diploma.
  • We can explain that NZQA-Registered tertiary education organisations go through a rigorous process to gain registration and must go through stringent processes to maintain registration with NZQA.  Non-registered TEOs do not go through this process and most times have no outside monitoring to ensure they meet local and national guidelines.
  • We can point out that an NZQA-Approved programme goes through a very thorough process, including reviews by industry experts and industry in general, before being approved.  Non-registered TEOs usually are not moderated and many times have no outside input to ensure the best standards for their students and graduates are available and enforced.
  • We can keep providing the old adages that, “You get what you pay for,” and “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.”
  • We can attempt to curb the public’s behaviour of supporting clinics hiring non-qualified nail technicians or beauty therapists through an education campaign.
  • We can try to convince potential nail technicians and beauty therapists that they should train through an NZQA-Registered tertiary education organisation and gain an NZQA-Approved qualification.

As an industry, we have been threatened with licensing and other compliance measures that will add more time and effort for the clinic owner, many of who are sole owner-operators, to meet bureaucratic requirements.  This will mean less time to have appointments and make money, and more time to fill out paperwork and spend money on meeting compliance measures.  But maybe this is what the industry needs to protect the general public and properly-trained nail technicians and beauty therapists from the rogues and cowboy operators out there.

The choice is ours as an industry to make.

Scott Fack is the Director of Operations at the National School of Aesthetics. He remains one of the beauty therapy education industry’s leaders in compliance requirements and quality management systems.

A Sneak Peek at a Major Change at NaSA in 2014

Launch your beauty career with NaSA

“But Scott,” I hear you say, “we’re only a little beyond halfway through 2013!  And you want to talk about 2014?!?”

I think a lot of people don’t quite understand how much forward planning goes into tertiary education.  We’re lucky that Private Training Establishments (PTEs) like ours respond to change and obstacles and whatever else is thrown in front of us quicker and with more ease than some of our Government-owned counterparts.  Pat on the back for PTEs.

I’m not going to get into a lot of the changes we’re making, as we’re still in various stages of planning for these, but I can release one tid bit of information that might be exciting for our 2014 prospective students:

We’ll have a combined Diploma in Beauty Therapy with Certificate in Nail Technology programme on offer in 2014.

That’s right.

Instead of taking 16 months or so to complete the Certificate in Nail Technology and then the Diploma in Beauty Therapy and Applied Aesthetics separately, 8 students will be able to complete both at the same time and within 10 months.

Even though the Targeted Review of Qualifications for beauty therapy qualifications is currently happening,  basically freezing all new qualification applications in their tracks, we are able to combine current qualifications to create what TEC calls “concurrent qualifications”, i.e. two or more programmes that run at the same time.

We’ll be trialling this in 2014, and once the New Zealand qualifications emerging from the TRoQ become finalised, and our programmes are aligned with them, we’ll let you know if we’ll continue offering these two programmes together.

2014 information, including the 2014 course information pack, should be available for download from our Web site, and posting out to New Zealand addresses from our offices, around Monday, 12 August 2013.  Sorry for the delay, but we have been extremely busy here!

There will also be a few major changes in the application, interview, and enrolment process at NaSA.  This information should be available in August as well.

Stay tuned for more developments as they become available.

Scott Fack is the Director of Operations at the National School of Aesthetics. He remains one of the beauty therapy education industry’s leaders in compliance requirements and quality management systems.